Jump to content


Mitsubishi A6M


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
37 replies to this topic

Hardstrike #21 Posted 05 May 2012 - 03:35 AM

    Senior Master Sergeant

  • Closed Beta Tester
  • 5999 battles
  • 218
  • [SF] SF
  • Member since:
    01-26-2012
When Claire Lee Chennault, the organizer of the AVG (The Flying Tigers) gave a thourough report on the capabilities of the Zero in early 1941, War Department analysts laughed at it.  They could not believe that the Japanese were capable of building a fighter with the high speed, maneuverability, armament, and range that the Zero possessed.  Thus, when American pilots first started fighting them, they were completely unprepared for what they faced.

Another advantage that the Americans gained as the war progressed was in training.  They would pull experienced pilots out of the front lines and send them stateside to train new pilots in effective tactics.  This served to both ensure that new pilots had a solid grasp on the sort of combat that would give them an edge over their opponents, as well as allowing the veterans to get rest and recuperation away from combat.  The Japanese pilots, in contrast, were expected to stay in the fight until the war was over.  New pilots were expected to learn what they needed to know from the veterans in their squadrons.  This worked about as well as it did for the British in WWI.

I heartily recommend "Samurai" by Saburo Sakai and Martin Caiden for some insights as to life as an aviator in the Imperial Japanese Navy.
Fly crooked and shoot straight.

xthetenth #22 Posted 05 May 2012 - 08:34 AM

    Second Lieutenant

  • Senior Alpha Test Veteran
  • 21 battles
  • 1,255
  • [SEAMN] SEAMN
  • Member since:
    12-15-2011
I'd really recommend Shattered Sword by Parshall and Tully if you want to know the operational context of IJN aviation and what broke it as a dominant force in the Pacific and a good account of how it actually worked in action.

Jinxed_Katajainen #23 Posted 15 June 2012 - 05:32 PM

    Feedback Airedale

  • Alpha tester
  • 47 battles
  • 2,444
  • Member since:
    01-28-2012
A tidbit on Model numbers...
When you see the Model number of a Japanese plane, such as Model 11 Zero, or Model 21 Zero, it's read as two digits separately, so Model one-one and Model two-one respectively instead of Model Eleven or Model Twenty-one.
This is because the first number is the body revision, second number is the engine revision.  Minor revisions without body or engine upgrades are denoted by kou/otsu/hei..  usually a/b/c.. in western publications.  It's pretty easy to follow when it's in a list.

For example..
Model 11 - First model produced
Model 21 - Added folding wingtips
Model 22 - New Sakae engine
Model 32 - Shorter wingspan
Model 32a - Upgraded 20mm cannon

Zeramas #24 Posted 15 June 2012 - 05:53 PM

    Senior Airman

  • Closed Beta Tester
  • 0 battles
  • 13
  • [MAPLE] MAPLE
  • Member since:
    01-26-2012
Beautiful plane, I'm eager to have Japanese planes, as well as British...
"They hit the bow, three of them, sir, and they blew very well" (...) "Look how well that *** exploded!"

Maus123 #25 Posted 16 June 2012 - 12:02 AM

    Master Sergeant

  • Closed Beta Tester
  • 32 battles
  • 69
  • Member since:
    02-01-2012
Unlike popular belief, The Zero was not at all superior to the P-40 Warhawk, it was on par with it.

xthetenth #26 Posted 16 June 2012 - 05:26 PM

    Second Lieutenant

  • Senior Alpha Test Veteran
  • 21 battles
  • 1,255
  • [SEAMN] SEAMN
  • Member since:
    12-15-2011

View PostHorokew, on 15 June 2012 - 05:32 PM, said:

A tidbit on Model numbers...
When you see the Model number of a Japanese plane, such as Model 11 Zero, or Model 21 Zero, it's read as two digits separately, so Model one-one and Model two-one respectively instead of Model Eleven or Model Twenty-one.
This is because the first number is the body revision, second number is the engine revision.  Minor revisions without body or engine upgrades are denoted by kou/otsu/hei..  usually a/b/c.. in western publications.  It's pretty easy to follow when it's in a list.

My god. Somebody managed to make a more confusing designation system than the US Navy. I still haven't figured out what the alphanumerical designations for Japanese planes meant. The USN ones make some sense once you know the rule.

View PostMaus123, on 16 June 2012 - 12:02 AM, said:

Unlike popular belief, The Zero was not at all superior to the P-40 Warhawk, it was on par with it.

That really depends on which models, where and the tactical situation. With the right models, it really comes down to the operating environment, tactics and skill of the pilots, which does make them roughly even in a lot of cases, but because of their wildly different focuses fights between the two planes could easily be wildly imbalanced.

Jinxed_Katajainen #27 Posted 16 June 2012 - 09:24 PM

    Feedback Airedale

  • Alpha tester
  • 47 battles
  • 2,444
  • Member since:
    01-28-2012

View Postxthetenth, on 16 June 2012 - 05:26 PM, said:

My god. Somebody managed to make a more confusing designation system than the US Navy. I still haven't figured out what the alphanumerical designations for Japanese planes meant. The USN ones make some sense once you know the rule.

The alphanumeric designations are similar to the USN.

Take the A6M Zero for example.
First letter is the aircraft type.  First number is sequence of aircraft of that type.  Second letter is manufacturer.  And any numbers that follow are revisions of this aircraft.

This give us A = Carrier based fighter, 6 = 6th Carrier based aircraft accepted for use, M = Mitsubishi.
Then for A6M1, A6M2, etc are the first revision, second revision etc.

What makes it more confusing is the Type/Model and the alphanumeric codes do reference the same aircraft.
A6M1 = Type Zero Prototype 12
A6M2 = Type Zero Model 11
A6M2b = Type Zero Model 21
A6M3 = Type Zero Model 22

Don't want to stray too far off topic of the Zero, but.. here are a few of the common ones.  I'll probably make a post later if anyone hasn't yet of the full list of codes.

Aircraft codes
A = Carrier Fighter (A6M Zero)
B = Carrier Attack (B5N Kate)
D = Carrier Bomber (D3A Val)
G = Land based bomber (G4M Betty)
J = Land based fighter (J2M Jack)

Manufacturer codes
A = Aichi
K = Kawanishi
M = Mitsubishi
N = Nakajima

xthetenth #28 Posted 17 June 2012 - 03:18 AM

    Second Lieutenant

  • Senior Alpha Test Veteran
  • 21 battles
  • 1,255
  • [SEAMN] SEAMN
  • Member since:
    12-15-2011
Did they reform the designation system before the Ki-84 came out?

Jinxed_Katajainen #29 Posted 17 June 2012 - 03:23 AM

    Feedback Airedale

  • Alpha tester
  • 47 battles
  • 2,444
  • Member since:
    01-28-2012
The Ki-## designation is for Japanese Army aircraft.  They just numbered them in order.
Both services used the 'Type ##' designation which just shows you what year it came into service.

xthetenth #30 Posted 17 June 2012 - 05:43 PM

    Second Lieutenant

  • Senior Alpha Test Veteran
  • 21 battles
  • 1,255
  • [SEAMN] SEAMN
  • Member since:
    12-15-2011
Ahh, so it's really basically a mirror image of the US practice but with an additional model year designation thrown in and a few slight differences. Weird.

GoodGuy2U #31 Posted 23 August 2012 - 09:51 PM

    Master Sergeant

  • Closed Beta Tester
  • 0 battles
  • 35
  • Member since:
    01-26-2012
Maybe they'll pair it off at tier 6, If I remember correctly, the F4F is tier 5, and that was pretty much inferior to the zero.
I don't always play games, but when I do, I WIN

kami666 #32 Posted 04 October 2012 - 11:25 PM

    Senior Airman

  • Closed Beta Tester
  • 0 battles
  • 14
  • Member since:
    10-31-2011
People get your intel right. The Zero was subdue only when the Allies were able to study it. There was a special Airforce task responsible for studying the Japanese aircraft. They were also responsible for naming the Japanese Firghters with boy names and Bombers with female names. Around 1942 thanks to a Catalina PBY they found an intact Zero upside down in an island as the newby Japanese Pilot fell and broke its neck. With all the intel they gainned at "Hangar 7" Australia. They developed the Hellcat. An aircraft designed to destroy and survive fights against the Zeros. Not a coincidence that Hellcats scored the highest number of kills during the Pacific Conflict.

Maus123 #33 Posted 06 October 2012 - 06:51 PM

    Master Sergeant

  • Closed Beta Tester
  • 32 battles
  • 69
  • Member since:
    02-01-2012

View Postkami666, on 04 October 2012 - 11:25 PM, said:

People get your intel right. The Zero was subdue only when the Allies were able to study it. There was a special Airforce task responsible for studying the Japanese aircraft. They were also responsible for naming the Japanese Firghters with boy names and Bombers with female names. Around 1942 thanks to a Catalina PBY they found an intact Zero upside down in an island as the newby Japanese Pilot fell and broke its neck. With all the intel they gainned at "Hangar 7" Australia. They developed the Hellcat. An aircraft designed to destroy and survive fights against the Zeros. Not a coincidence that Hellcats scored the highest number of kills during the Pacific Conflict.
:facepalm_wowp:
http://worldofwarpla...nd-akutan-zero/

Thormenter #34 Posted 07 October 2012 - 02:50 PM

    Senior Master Sergeant

  • Closed Beta Tester
  • 0 battles
  • 136
  • Member since:
    07-25-2012
and again a painfull proof that, when flying a national military secret, you have to be ready to shoot your wounded buddy... :Smile_amazed:

D_Blitz1997 #35 Posted 28 October 2012 - 02:21 AM

    Master Sergeant

  • Closed Beta Tester
  • 0 battles
  • 41
  • Member since:
    08-06-2012
Well I would wonder what would happen if the Zero and the Italian Macchi MC.202 come face to face?

nikko211 #36 Posted 26 November 2012 - 03:02 PM

    Senior Master Sergeant

  • Closed Beta Tester
  • 0 battles
  • 156
  • Member since:
    01-26-2012

View Post@John_Kyro, on 26 October 2011 - 07:14 PM, said:

but for real what made the Japanese Aviators Think that "kamikazee" it's a good way to win a war?  http://cdn-frm-us.wa...default/huh.gif
This was a symbol of honor. It may not be important to you, but this was a very high military stauts for any pilot. The planes they flew had sealed cokpits, so they couldn't escape.
And having a plane with full fuel and packed so much with explosives fly down into a ship was very deadly.
World of Warplanes beta tester. My eyes were burnt out of their sockets.

nikko211 #37 Posted 26 November 2012 - 03:05 PM

    Senior Master Sergeant

  • Closed Beta Tester
  • 0 battles
  • 156
  • Member since:
    01-26-2012

View PostHorokew, on 15 June 2012 - 05:32 PM, said:

A tidbit on Model numbers...
When you see the Model number of a Japanese plane, such as Model 11 Zero, or Model 21 Zero, it's read as two digits separately, so Model one-one and Model two-one respectively instead of Model Eleven or Model Twenty-one.
This is because the first number is the body revision, second number is the engine revision.  Minor revisions without body or engine upgrades are denoted by kou/otsu/hei..  usually a/b/c.. in western publications.  It's pretty easy to follow when it's in a list.

For example..
Model 11 - First model produced
Model 21 - Added folding wingtips
Model 22 - New Sakae engine
Model 32 - Shorter wingspan
Model 32a - Upgraded 20mm cannon
Is there any more model examples like the Model 52a? (I think I saw something about a Zero and 52...............)
World of Warplanes beta tester. My eyes were burnt out of their sockets.

Jinxed_Katajainen #38 Posted 28 November 2012 - 10:14 PM

    Feedback Airedale

  • Alpha tester
  • 47 battles
  • 2,444
  • Member since:
    01-28-2012

View Postnikko211, on 26 November 2012 - 03:05 PM, said:

Is there any more model examples like the Model 52a? (I think I saw something about a Zero and 52...............)

Yep.. I just gave the early examples.

The rest are
Model 52 - Exhaust propulsion added, overall width reduced, larger flaps
Model 52a - Type 4 20mm gun
Model 52b - 13mm gun on right cowl
Model 52c - Removed 7mm gun, armored gas tanks added
Model 53c - New Sakae Type 31 engine
Model 54c - New Kinsei Type 62 engine
Model 62 - Fighter bomber model with fuselage bomb racks




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users