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info on some of the jets , planes in the game and footage of them flying


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sandtiger #1 Posted 02 April 2019 - 09:45 PM

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F-104 Starfighter - Supposed To Be The Air Force’s Fastest, Highest-Flying Combat Jet Of Its Time

 

 

i sorry for the voice i can not change that

 

 

 

 

 


Edited by sandtiger, 03 April 2019 - 06:31 AM.


sandtiger #2 Posted 02 April 2019 - 09:49 PM

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sandtiger #3 Posted 02 April 2019 - 09:57 PM

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sandtiger #4 Posted 02 April 2019 - 10:30 PM

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sandtiger #5 Posted 02 April 2019 - 10:41 PM

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we only have the Japaneses one at this time 



sandtiger #6 Posted 02 April 2019 - 10:47 PM

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sandtiger #7 Posted 02 April 2019 - 11:05 PM

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sandtiger #8 Posted 03 April 2019 - 06:31 AM

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Chuck_norris10 #9 Posted 03 April 2019 - 04:55 PM

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Dont forget the one that got away,the Avro arrow. This is a simulation if one was flying today but it's pretty cool.

Not many Canadians my age have forgot about this beautiful work of art. 

1959 and they were supposedly all destroyed.When you have to intercept soviet intruders in the arctic this would have been the ultimate interceptor. Enjoy the vid and if your russian....we may still have a few kicking around so stay out of our arctic airspace! :izmena:

 


 

 


 

Blond_Knight_Ironcross #10 Posted 03 April 2019 - 08:13 PM

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sandtiger #11 Posted 06 April 2019 - 05:38 PM

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ALL CALL this oops Rolls Royce  that was a huge mistake  i sure the Russian pilot of today will thank you for you

big mess up

 



sandtiger #12 Posted 06 April 2019 - 08:40 PM

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Even though the six 0.50-inch machine guns of the Sabre had a high rate of fire, one of the primary complaints by Sabre pilots was that these guns really didn't pack enough punch to ensure a kill of every MiG that got into their gunsights. The MiG-15 was actually a fairly robust aircraft, one which could sustain a considerable amount of damage and still keep flying. Colonel Glenn Eagleston submitted a report in which he estimated that as much as two-thirds of the MiGs hit by Sabre gunfire had actually escaped to return home and fight another day. A heavier cannon armament was clearly needed, but one which still preserved the high rate of fire of the machine guns which would give a higher probability of a kill during air combat.

It is a little known fact that some operational trials were actually carried out in Korea with cannon-armed Sabres. Four F-86E-10s (serial numbers 51-2803, 2819, 2826 and 2836) and six F-86F-1s (serial numbers 51-2855, 2861, 2867, 2868, 2884 and 2900) were pulled off the North American assembly line and fitted with a quartet of T-160 20-mm cannon and redesignated F-86F-2-NA. The T-160 guns were belt-fed and were capable of firing 1500 rounds per minute. The gun bays had to be completely redesigned and the guns had to be spaced further apart vertically with a totally new blast panel. The ammunition canisters could carry only 100 rounds each, for about 6 seconds of firing. The gun mounts had to be strengthened and the nose structure around the guns had to be beefed up in order to handle the extra amount of recoil. In order to prevent the buildup of gun gas in the cannon bays, where it could be an explosion and fire hazard, small doors were cut into the interior of the intake duct to extract the gun gas and suck it into the engine.

First tests were carried out with 51-2803 by test pilot George Welch over the Pacific firing range near Catalina Island. All test flights and gun firings were carried out at altitudes between 10,000 and 25,000 feet, with no problems being encountered. The remaining F-86F-2-NAs were delivered to the Air Force Armament Test Center at Eglin AFB.

The cannon-armed Sabre project came to be known as Project Gunval. Eight F-86F-2s were transferred to the 4th Wing in Korea in January 1953 for actual combat tests. The Gunval project was assigned to the 335th FIS, commanded by LtCol Vermont Garrison. Almost immediately, problems were encountered. In the very first aerial combats, the engines of the Gunval Sabres flamed out immediately when the cannon were fired, and no hits on MiGs were scored.

All of the *Gunval* Sabres had to be grounded to figure out what the problem was. It turned that during the firing of the cannon, excessive amounts of gun gas were being sucked into the engine, much larger amounts than the engineers had expected. The early stateside firing tests had been carried out at lower altitudes and no problems had been encountered, but at higher altitudes there was lesser oxygen to run the engine and the gun gas was causing a compressor stall, resulting in a flameout.

The idea of extracting the gun gas by sucking it into the engine had to be abandoned. The doors that bled gun gas into the engine intake duct were welded shut, and a selector switch was installed in the cockpit that permitted the pilot to be able to choose either two or four cannon firing. Small holes were drilled into the aft portion of the gun bay doors to alleviate gun gas buildup. These changes seemed to cure most of the gun gas buildup problems.

However, gun gas problems soon returned once combat trials were resumed. Test photos indicated that large amounts of gun gas were building up ahead of the nose during firing and were being ingested directly into the intake. This problem was ultimately solved by North American engineer Paul Peterson, who added a small horseshoe-shaped clip inside the recessed nozzle trough of each weapon. This clip broke up the gun gas, deflecting it away from the nose of the aircraft and trailing it harmlessly away in the wake of the aircraft.

This seemed to cure the gun gas ingestion problem, and combat tests resumed. A total of 282 combat missions were flown. Out of the 41 MiGs fired at, six were destroyed, three were probably destroyed, and 13 were damaged. Two *Gunval* Sabres were hit by MiG cannon fire, but both aircraft were able to return safely to base. The *Gunval* tests were completed on May 1, 1953, and the surviving aircraft were sent back to the USA, ultimately to be assigned to the Colorado Air National Guard *Minutemen* aerobatic team.

The combat tests were sufficiently encouraging that the T-160 cannon was placed into production by a division of the Ford Motor Company as the M-39, and the cannon ended up arming the F-86H and some of the Century Series of supersonic fighters.

Following the end of the Korean War, two F-86F-1-NAs (51-2916 and 51-2926) were fitted with Oerlikon 206RK 20-mm cannon and were redesignated F-86F-3-NA. Tests were carried out at Eglin AFB in April of 1954. The Oerlikon installation was not very successful--the guns were much heavier than the T-160s, resulting in a shift of the aircraft's center of gravity. In addition, the barrel life was too short and the stoppage rate was unsatisfactory. The F-86F-3s were assigned to Air Proving Ground Command for further tests in 1954-55, being redesignated JF-86F in 1957 and eventually scrapped.

Source:

 
  1. North American F-86 Sabre, Larry Davis, Wings of Fame, Volume 10, 1998

 

 

 

 



Chuck_norris10 #13 Posted 07 April 2019 - 11:18 AM

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So if a Canadian line was ever launched where would the avro cf 105 arrow fit in or would it be available?

Imagine climbing to 50,000 feet at 1000 mph. Plus it could pack 2 count em,2 nuclear air to air missiles.No guidance system needed. Good for taking out those nasty bomber formations.:trollface:

 

  • Maximum speed: Mach 1.98 (1,307 mph, 2,104 km/h) at 50,000 ft (15,000 m) max. ...
  • Cruise speed: Mach 0.91 (607 mph, 977 km/h) at 36,000 ft (11,000 m)
  • Combat radius: 360 NM (410 mi, 660 km)
  • Service ceiling: 53,000 ft (16,150 m)
  • Wing loading: 46.5 lb/ft² (226.9 kg/m²)
  • Thrust/weight: 0.825 at loaded weight.

In 1955 Avro had estimated the performance of the Arrow 2 (with Iroquois) as follows (from the January 1955: In 1955 Avro estimated the performance of the Arrow Mk 2 (with Iroquois) as follows (from the January 1955 British evaluation titled Evaluation of the CF.105 as an All Weather Fighter for the RAF”: Max speed Mach 1.9 at 50,000 ft, Combat speed of Mach 1.5 at 50.000 feet and 1.84 G without bleeding energy, time to 50,000 ft of 4.1 minutes, 500 foot per minute climb ceiling of 62,000 feet, 400 nm radius on a high-speeds mission, 630 nm radius on a low-speed mission

 

 


Edited by Chuck_norris10, 07 April 2019 - 11:28 AM.

 

 


 

sandtiger #14 Posted 07 April 2019 - 10:45 PM

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sandtiger #15 Posted 07 April 2019 - 10:53 PM

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maybe the arrow would have to be the tier 9 or ten in that line if they every made it

 


Edited by sandtiger, 07 April 2019 - 10:54 PM.


Chuck_norris10 #16 Posted 08 April 2019 - 12:08 AM

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View Postsandtiger, on 02 April 2019 - 02:45 PM, said:

F-104 Starfighter - Supposed To Be The Air Force’s Fastest, Highest-Flying Combat Jet Of Its Time

 

 

i sorry for the voice i can not change that

 

 

 

 

 

 

This could be in the Canadian line if they ever do one.

The Canadair CF-104 Starfighter (CF-111CL-90) was a modified version of the Lockheed F-104 Starfighter supersonic fighter aircraft built in Canada by Canadair under licence. It was primarily used as a ground attack aircraft, despite being designed as an interceptor. It served with the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) and later the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) until it was replaced by the McDonnell Douglas CF-18 Hornet.

 


 

 


 

sandtiger #17 Posted 08 April 2019 - 07:40 AM

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now that you got me look in to the Canadian  air force there are a lot of there planes already in the game lol

saber mustang mosquito spit fire   are just a few that they have in the game that the RCAF used i try to find some more planes now  that the  flew 

i just like the idea of the Canadian saber with a better motor lol

 



sandtiger #18 Posted 08 April 2019 - 07:43 AM

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Chuck this one is for you ... i thought you might like it  :honoring:


Edited by sandtiger, 08 April 2019 - 07:37 PM.


sandtiger #19 Posted 08 April 2019 - 08:06 PM

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Spoiler

 



sandtiger #20 Posted 08 April 2019 - 08:27 PM

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