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R U a german fighter fan?


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trikke #1 Posted 31 March 2018 - 12:58 PM

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me, too... so let's learn the diff between a Bf-109 and a Me-109

 

gee, they sure look similar, so what's up with the name confusion?

 

According to the guys at the Bundesluftwaffe, the change in designation refers to the moment in 1938 that designer Willy Messerschmitt gained a controlling share of the company that he’d worked for, the Bayerische Flugzeugwerke, from which “Bf” was derived.   Anything in production prior to that retained the “Bf” designation, while anything entering service afterward was “Me.” 

Among the planes to which that transition applied were:

Bf-109B through D, but Me-109E through K

Bf-110A and B, but Me-110C through G


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mnbv_fockewulfe #2 Posted 31 March 2018 - 01:34 PM

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ME Me me mE

Be sure to check your logic privileges before posting on the forum.

 

mnbv_fockewulfe.png


 


PostTraumatic #3 Posted 31 March 2018 - 02:14 PM

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That's something I had wondered about but never looked up.  Very interesting 

 



Martymart1976 #4 Posted 31 March 2018 - 03:16 PM

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Did you know that German fighter production in 44-45 actually increased in spite of the Allies strategic bombing plan?  The Germans just didn't have the fuel or trained pilots left...

NovaTempest #5 Posted 31 March 2018 - 04:35 PM

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View Posttrikke, on 31 March 2018 - 12:58 PM, said:

me, too... so let's learn the diff between a Bf-109 and a Me-109

 

gee, they sure look similar, so what's up with the name confusion?

 

According to the guys at the Bundesluftwaffe, the change in designation refers to the moment in 1938 that designer Willy Messerschmitt gained a controlling share of the company that he’d worked for, the Bayerische Flugzeugwerke, from which “Bf” was derived.   Anything in production prior to that retained the “Bf” designation, while anything entering service afterward was “Me.” 

Among the planes to which that transition applied were:

Bf-109B through D, but Me-109E through K

Bf-110A and B, but Me-110C through G

 

I remember looking this up last year and finding this out, though its nice to know others dig this up to share here on the forums. +1 From me.

Furysghost #6 Posted 31 March 2018 - 07:48 PM

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Did you also know that they were building A/C in the forest and in caves, parts and complete planes cuz anything that looked like a factory was a bomber target.

So heres a lil gem for ur perusal just in case ur a war history buff like me...

 

https://books.google... forest&f=false


Edited by Furysghost, 31 March 2018 - 07:49 PM.


Wombatmetal #7 Posted 31 March 2018 - 07:58 PM

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View PostMartymart1976, on 31 March 2018 - 07:16 AM, said:

Did you know that German fighter production in 44-45 actually increased in spite of the Allies strategic bombing plan?  The Germans just didn't have the fuel or trained pilots left...

 

This shows the importance of doctrine in the outcome of wars is just as important as technology or pilots. German and Japanese pilots were deployed and stayed deployed until they were shot down or the war ended.

 

America rotated her pilots; after a certain number of missions the pilots came home to train new pilots and share lessons learned on the front. This produced a steady stream of trained pilots and institutional knowledge of combat techniques. Really made a difference



Cloud_1 #8 Posted 31 March 2018 - 10:18 PM

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View PostDestroyer_Suzukaze, on 31 March 2018 - 07:58 PM, said:

 

This shows the importance of doctrine in the outcome of wars is just as important as technology or pilots. German and Japanese pilots were deployed and stayed deployed until they were shot down or the war ended.

 

America rotated her pilots; after a certain number of missions the pilots came home to train new pilots and share lessons learned on the front. This produced a steady stream of trained pilots and institutional knowledge of combat techniques. Really made a difference

 

America had the resources to do that ,Germany and Japan, on the other hand were fighting leadership,time and resources. A losing combo in any war of attrition

Respectfully

.

 


Edited by Cloud_1, 31 March 2018 - 10:19 PM.


Wombatmetal #9 Posted 01 April 2018 - 08:43 AM

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View PostCloud_1, on 31 March 2018 - 02:18 PM, said:

 

America had the resources to do that ,Germany and Japan, on the other hand were fighting leadership,time and resources. A losing combo in any war of attrition

Respectfully

.

 

 

No disrespect at all, and I mean none either, but Germany and Japan even if they had the resources would not have adopted this doctrine. Early in the war Germany could have managed it and did not. In Japan teaching was not honorable for a warrior.

 

 

 

 



comtedumas #10 Posted 01 April 2018 - 09:10 AM

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View PostDestroyer_Suzukaze, on 31 March 2018 - 02:58 PM, said:

 

This shows the importance of doctrine in the outcome of wars is just as important as technology or pilots. German and Japanese pilots were deployed and stayed deployed until they were shot down or the war ended.

 

America rotated her pilots; after a certain number of missions the pilots came home to train new pilots and share lessons learned on the front. This produced a steady stream of trained pilots and institutional knowledge of combat techniques. Really made a difference

I think Soviet pilots were deployed till they died, too.  



SpiritFoxMY #11 Posted 01 April 2018 - 10:39 AM

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https://youtu.be/k6WIN7Ysygc

 

https://youtu.be/nR0r7yrowhU

 

Training was always a weak spot in Japanese and German doctrine. While even during the Battle of Britain, the RAF rotated pilots through training and inexperienced squadrons, Germany always preferred to concentrate its best crews in special squadrons of experten. The Japanese otoh, had a culture of Aces who positively loathed the very idea of training new pilots.

 

It wasn't just the result of insufficient resources.


***

But a truce to this mournful story

For death is a distant friend

So here's to a life of glory

And a laurel to crown each end


trikke #12 Posted 01 April 2018 - 02:27 PM

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View PostSpiritFoxMY, on 01 April 2018 - 05:39 AM, said:

Germany always preferred to concentrate its best crews in special squadrons of experten. The Japanese otoh, had a culture of Aces who positively loathed the very idea of training new pilots.

 

yep...   and now i have a nagging realization that i would have supported that kind of elitism, too

 

i see it in myself...  that i only wish to flight up with other pilots equal or better than myself 

 

it wouldn't occur to me to offer to help others with less experience, i'm so spoiled because i know many excellent pilots

 

the excellent pilots that i know are not selfish, are not spoiled...  because they readily flight up with me, knowingly risking WR bruises 

 

they know about the pleasures of helping others get better...   and i don't 

 

i'm just like the Japanese and German pilots that made the unconscious fatal decision to refuse to share essential tribal knowledge 

 

 

but hopefully, it's not too late for me...

 

 

 

 


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Furysghost #13 Posted 04 April 2018 - 12:07 AM

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View PostWombatmetal, on 31 March 2018 - 11:58 AM, said:

 

This shows the importance of doctrine in the outcome of wars is just as important as technology or pilots. German and Japanese pilots were deployed and stayed deployed until they were shot down or the war ended.

 

America rotated her pilots; after a certain number of missions the pilots came home to train new pilots and share lessons learned on the front. This produced a steady stream of trained pilots and institutional knowledge of combat techniques. Really made a difference

 

Excellent post!

Captain_Rownd #14 Posted 05 April 2018 - 04:06 PM

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View Posttrikke, on 31 March 2018 - 12:58 PM, said:

me, too... so let's learn the diff between a Bf-109 and a Me-109

 

Unless one goes down in red flames and the other goes down in orange flames, how will I tell the difference before they go "boom"? 

Mojoe_Bailey #15 Posted 07 April 2018 - 09:17 AM

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I haven't used any German planes past tier I, but I've seen a guy who is number one on the scoreboards and he ONLY uses German aircraft. Food for thought. 




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