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F-4 Phantom Gallery and High Res Wallpaper Images


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MARS_REVENANT #1 Posted 11 October 2017 - 03:10 AM

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Gallery Here: http://thechive.com/...m-39-hq-photos/

 

Wallpaper Quality Images Here: https://www.facebook...791627124215457

 

 

REGARDS_

MARS_


1.9.x Forum Stats: Colonel; Member; 34638 battles; 7,526 message_img.pngMember since: 01-26-2012

 

I never lose; either I win or I learn.

 


KloudRains #2 Posted 12 October 2017 - 12:25 AM

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Thanks Marco,

My viewing prolly a bit more intense than most of the WoWP players because the F-4 cockpit was my workplace for about 9 years.

I flew the F-4C, the F-4D, F-4E and the RF-4C. The latter was for only a few flights at Edwards AFB to test out a prospective HUD for the F-4 fleet. That test bird had a backseat without stick or rudder. I had a bit over 150 combat missions in the D and a few in the E. 

The bird in a number of the photos, #926, is actually one I likely strapped on. It has TISEO on the left wing around the mid-point. This was an electro-optical system which could give "telescopic" visual display for target ID. I once identified a "friendly" Mig-21 at nine miles with it. Thus, giving the opportunity to make positive identification of an enemy bird before he could even visually detect you - and he would likely eat a Sparrow missile as the first clue of his bad circumstances. The TISEO was on but a very few birds, late in the F-4E life. The other noteworthy item is that the F-4E got leading-edge, maneuvering flaps, also as a late retrofit. On some of the views they can be seen in the extended position. They automatically extended and retracted in response to angle of attack. This is the model (the ones with TISEO and maneuvering flaps) we used to fly adversary flights against the YF-16 and YF-17 for operational suitability, in the spring of 1974.  It happened that I was the Lightweight Fighter operational test manager. - primary responsibility for creating the testing reports for operational qualities - to assess what kind of fighting machine it would make.  No surprise; I chose myself as one of the four pilots to fly against the prototypes (YF-16 and YF-17) as part of selecting what became the F-16 production bird. 

Lotta good memories in the set of photos. Thanks again.






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