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Slip compensation?


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Olaffe #1 Posted 18 November 2014 - 06:15 PM

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Means when you turn using ailerons, the program gives you the right amount of rudder.  Would there be any reason to have it turned off, other than because you want to apply the correct rudder yourself?  Why would you want to apply the correct amount of pedal yourself? More immersion, satisfaction?

Here is the BIG question how can you use turning off slip compensation to your advantage, or can you?

 

 



losttwo #2 Posted 18 November 2014 - 06:19 PM

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I never wear a slip under my kilt

RedSpartacus #3 Posted 18 November 2014 - 06:26 PM

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How do you roll around the long axis when there's always rudder given ?


 

@losttwo

please don't fly upside down


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von_Krimm #4 Posted 18 November 2014 - 06:57 PM

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for the vast majority of players there is no benefit to not having it enabled; most players do not utilise the most advanced ACM maneuvers which would require specific amounts of rudder inputs to achieve the maneuver (subject to the limitations of the flight model, ofc) successfully.  If you want to reduce it to 50% (my setting)  as an experiment, do try it and you might find that you achieve a mild advantage in ACM.
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losttwo #5 Posted 18 November 2014 - 07:37 PM

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View PostRedSpartacus, on 18 November 2014 - 01:26 PM, said

 

@losttwo

please don't fly upside down

 

Why ? you scared you might see my bagpipe's ?:veryhappy:

CrazyHeinz #6 Posted 18 November 2014 - 10:11 PM

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View Postlosttwo, on 18 November 2014 - 02:37 PM, said:

 

Why ? you scared you might see my bagpipe's ?:veryhappy:

 

Your bagpipe's what?


ParanoiaXtreme_PRX #7 Posted 18 November 2014 - 11:37 PM

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View Postlosttwo, on 18 November 2014 - 07:37 PM, said:

 

Why ? you scared you might see my bagpipe's ?:veryhappy:

 

Rofl

Azis_ #8 Posted 21 November 2014 - 09:13 PM

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View PostBillpatty, on 18 November 2014 - 10:15 AM, said:

Means when you turn using ailerons, the program gives you the right amount of rudder.  Would there be any reason to have it turned off, other than because you want to apply the correct rudder yourself?  Why would you want to apply the correct amount of pedal yourself? More immersion, satisfaction?

Here is the BIG question how can you use turning off slip compensation to your advantage, or can you?

 

 

 

I have not checked recently but last I did this setting did very little if anything. I have tried turning it off and with a joystick and twist rudder, am still unable to put any plane into a full slip or uncoordinated turn. Initiating a slip is done by applying opposite rudder or aileron input IE: right aileron/left rudder or vice vs. This is used to advantage by many tailwheel and biplane pilots that have impaired forward vision as a landing aid. It allows the plane to maintain a straight line while it is pointed almost 45 degrees to that same line. The other advantage it offers is being able to loose altitude quickly, without gaining airspeed by pointing the nose down.

I have no doubt that earlier slower bi planes also used this in combat maneuvers. It could be used to drop down on an enemy without gaining forward speed causing over run. Since it is an uncoordinated attitude, it can also have undesirable effects, (spins, stalls etc) and is mostly reserved for slower more maneuverable planes that do not have flaps. Slipping, like flaps, induces drag reducing airspeed. Unlike flaps, slipping defeats lift.


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