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Spicy Air Tales: Amazing Aeroventures!


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PressureLine #1 Posted 17 December 2013 - 04:55 AM

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Everyone loves a good story, so I've decided, that amongst all the other stuff I'm doing at the moment, I would regale you all with some of my daring exploits! (other pilots too, if I die early and see something spectacular)

 

First up comes "Hunt the Il-2" a tale from the frozen north...

 

Arctic Region, tier IV/V/VI battle, I was the only GA in the entire match. With a bit of black humor I type out in public chat "Lets play 'hunt the Il-2'" then "Oh wait..." everyone has a bit of a laugh then the match starts.

 

I am at the south start point, easternmost spawn. I dive down to just above the level of the waves and proceed east, dropping markers on the southeast snowfield, in the hope that a few of my teammates will head over there and distract any enemy fighters that head that way. To the refrain of 'She'll be coming round the mountain' I... erm... Come around the mountain and take out the two ships at anchor there. Dropping back down to the deck I take note of the dogfight building over the snowfield, looks like a few of my fellow pilots listened to me and are doing their bit to keep the enemy occupied and off my tail. So far so good, skimming the waves I proceed north to the enemy base.

 

The furballs over the snowfield and the one over the mountains in the north have coalesced into a single high altitude battle over the centre of the map. Looking at the minimap, it seems all the enemy planes are accounted for, no-one is even looking for me. A warship off the coast is destroyed in a fullisade of rockets, cannon and machinegun fire as I head inland to the enemy HQ. A pair of rockets, some gunfire and a pair of 100kg bombs take care of the HQ as I head up over the geyser field. An AA gun and the warehouse it was meant to protect are leveled by another bomb. The furball is beginning to wind down now, 4 enemy fighters vs 3 of mine, we are ahead by a point or two in supremacy, not enough. Narrowly missing another double GT kill with a bomb and my remaining rocket I decide to continue west across the top of the map to the last possible double GT kill.

 

The situation in the middle of the map is getting desparate as there is only one other friendly plane in the air against two of theirs, wishing the valiant fighter pilot luck I dive on a group of tanks and an AA gun and release my final bomb then turn to enter the so called 'Death Star trench.' Friendly observers note another two GT kills, for a total of 11 supremacy points to add to my tally. Whatever happens now I will be happy. I approach the northern mouth of the trench and head in, cutting the throttle and dropping flaps my speed drops to just over 100mph. The last fighter pilot wishes me luck as his flaming wreck of a plane makes it's last dive.

 

"You are the last hope!" 5 points ahead in supremacy, undetected, fairly well hidden, I got this. Carefully managing my speed I cruise down the ice canyon as the supremacy counter ticks up. 75%! "We are about to win!" One of the remaining enemy pilots wistfully comments over an open channel that they "Should have listened to the Il." Yes, you should have. I spot one of the enemy planes high overhead as the counter hits 95%. I am still deep in the trench and well camouflaged, he doesn't see me. The counter winds on until... Victory!

 

Thanks to the efforts of a few dedicated fighter pilots, and one plucky Il-2, our forces were victorious despite losing air superiority, well done comrades! Все для победы! Everything for victory!

 



NathanFlightLeader #2 Posted 17 December 2013 - 04:59 AM

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Good job. Having a supremacy advantage and being in a GA is the only time I am happy to hear "You are the last hope". I usually curse if I'm in a fighter.
"It is generally inadvisable to eject directly over the area you just bombed."
"The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire."
The three most common expressions (or famous last words) in aviation are: "Why is it doing that?", "Where are we?" And "Oh S...!"
"Airspeed, altitude and brains. Two are always needed to successfully complete the flight."
Flying isn't dangerous. Crashing is what's dangerous.

PressureLine #3 Posted 17 December 2013 - 05:31 AM

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"Chaos over the Pacific"

 

As an air battle over the Pacific swept higher than my Mitsubishi A6M2 could comfortably climb I turned my attention to the part of the map where friendly ground forces were reporting being under attack. dropping over the ridgeline on the northwestern island I spotted a lonely Soviet Il-2 strafing a friendly warship.

 

Quickly closing the distance to firing range I began the attack. I chipped away at the tough hide of the Russian plane as it made a beeline for my HQ, making sure to stay clear of any potential bomb blasts incase the pilot decided that would be a good way to get me off his tail. As he turned to begin his attack run on the HQ I noticed another enemy blip appear on the screen. It was a second Il-2, making his attack run from the opposite direction. Being in a better position to attack the second one I broke off my pursuit of the first one and dove in, all guns blazing. I would never, not even with a thousand guesses, would have predicted what was about to transpire.

 

The second Il-2 let fly with all he had on my HQ, including several high explosive rockets. The rockets impacted less than 100 feet from the first Il-2 which was just finishing its own pass on the HQ. The Ilyushin is a tough bird, but nothing is that tough, down he went. The second Il-2 was, however, alive and well, and continuing his path of destruction through our base. After hammering away at him with mg and cannon for a while, and dodging his repeated attempts to catch me in a bomb blast, his plane joined its erstwhile brother in the Pacific.

 

The aerial battle had gone well, only a 3 enemy planes remained, but combined, the efforts of the unlucky Il-2's had turned the tide in the enemy's favor. Straining to eke out every last ounce of performance from my plane's overheating engine I raced to meet up with the other 4 remaining friendly pilots. Only a single enemy Mustang stood between us and victory. Watching the enemy quickly gaining supremacy after achieving a 5 point lead  I called out "Concentrate fire on a single GT!" My team responded with gusto, shredding an enemy ship in a hail of gunfire. Then the unthinkable happened, two friendly planes failed to pull up in time and crashed into the hulk of the very ship they had just destroyed, putting us even further behind our foes.

 

Laughing, the last enemy pilot taunted us saying that we "May as well give up now." Not in this lifetime buddy. Only one of our remaining planes was fit for a high altitude pursuit, a Bf 109F, wishing him luck on his search a badly damaged Spitfire and I turned our attention to the remaining enemy shipping. Making quick work of an already damaged transport vessel we bought our high-flying friend some time to seek and destroy the enemy fighter.

 

While making a pass on a group of beached landing craft the news we had been waiting for came through. The enemy had been spotted and our friend was in pursuit! Receiving further reports that the situation was otherwise grim, the Spitfire pilot and I continued our attack runs on the beached boats. Our efforts had given the friendly 109F enough time to engage his quarry, and a furious 1 on 1 dogfight erupted high above the ocean.

 

We still needed more time however. Being well aware of the fact the Spitfire was barely holding itself together as it was, I called out another target. This time a merchant vessel anchored half a mile from the now wrecked landing craft. Unarmed as it was, it was only a matter of time before we caused enough damage to sink it. As we prepared for our second strafing run, a joyous shout came across the radio. The 109F had succeeded in destroying the final enemy plane! With victory secured we could rest a little easier, until next time...



Aurabird #4 Posted 17 December 2013 - 05:45 AM

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these as such a nice read, looking forward to more! :great:

PressureLine #5 Posted 17 December 2013 - 08:00 AM

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"Legend of the Destroyer"

 

Tales abound in Novorossiysk of an aerial battle witnessed by it's citizens early in the war. The enemy was massing for an attack on the port city and had sent in advance parties to assess the situation, and pave the way for the main attack, these parties consisted of a small naval force of converted merchant vessels, some installations in the hills centered around an unused airfield, and a small contingent of planes. A call to arms was issued, and 7 pilots mustered out to meet the enemy...

 

I was out in my TSh-2, with another volunteer manning the rear gun. We began our advance well west of the main force of planes, who proceeded to engage the enemy in the hills to the east of the harbour. I became absorbed in destroying the enemy's naval 'force' and as I overflew the smoking wreck of the last boat the defense commander radioed in "You are are last hope." There were 5 enemy planes left, gritting my teeth I firewalled the throttle as I formulated a plan.

 

Gathering what speed I could I headed back to the foothills to the west of the harbour. My tailgunner began reporting indications of enemy aircraft approaching so I spun the plane around and prepared to meet death head on. First was the fastest, an Ao 192, a converted transport plane of German manufacture. Waiting until I was sure of hitting, I then opened fire. The PV-1 may not be the most impressive weapon on its own, but the ten of them fitted to my TSh-2 created a wall of lead that turned a previously well turned-out plane into a pile of flaming debris on the hillside below. The slower plane following him was destroyed in much the same manner.

 

An Ar 68 biplane swooped in from 9 o'clock high, managed to bring his guns to bear and let off a burst of gunfire. Thankfully both myself and my tailgunner were fine, but our plane was in trouble. The engine had stopped, and I was now trailing a stream of thick black oily smoke. "Not to worry!" I yelled over my shoulder "We are still flying half a plane!" I began a gentle bank to starboard as the Ar 68 turned on his way back for another pass. Noticing that he had already taken some damage from the earlier aerial battle, and was taking more from a friendly AA emplacement that the battle was now drifting over, I lined up on the approaching plane. My machineguns chattered, his plane went down in a ball of flame.

 

"That's three down!" was my triumphant cry. My tailgunner used this opportunity to draw my attention to the fact that there was only one enemy plane still flying, the other having inexplicibly crashed, I never found out why. 'One on one.' I can do this. My engine suddenly coughed back to life, still belching thick black smoke. I cautiously advanced the throttle, allowing my plane to claw its way back into the realm of powered flight.

 

"This is more like it!" I exclaimed as the final enemy pilot lined his plane up for an attack. His was a good plan, but poorly executed. Apparantly not having learned from the deaths of his comrades he was flying straight into my guns, I pulled the gun lever one last time as I felt the bullets from his guns slam into the frame of my battered aircraft. There was an almighty crash from below, I released the lever and peered over the edge of the cockpit, four pillars of smoke marking the resting places of those who attempted to defeat the Destroyer of Novorossiysk.

 

[This was a particularly memorable battle for me, not only did I get a Destroyer medal (which afaik you can't get in attack aircraft anymore) but I also received a Rechkalov's medal (for standing alone vs 5 enemies and winning) which you also cannot get anymore]



PressureLine #6 Posted 17 December 2013 - 09:02 AM

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"Things are just as bad as they seem..."

 

As the war came into full swing I was offered the opportunity to fly the BSh-1, an attack aircraft of Soviet manufacture. I won't bore you with the details but suffice it to say it is a good, solid aircraft with a big set of bomb racks. Many of the missions I have flown in this type of craft have been unremarkable, but some have been remarkable for all the wrong reasons...

 

My tailgunner and I received our flying orders, 'Proceed to the El Halluf battle area. Suppress enemy air defences, and destroy other targets as the opportunity arises.' Pretty standard stuff really. Only one problem, shortly after reaching the battle area I blacked out.*

 

I awoke to find my gunner screaming at me in near panic, it didn't take long to figure out why. We were surrounded. Outnumbered and outgunned, there was only one thing to do. I dipped my starboard wing and hauled back on the stick. Now perpendicular to the ground I set the throttle to full emergency power. If we survived my mechanic was going to have a few strong words for me, but survival was hardly a certainty at this point. As luck would have it we were screaming straight down towards a collection of enemy barges, figuring I may as well do something useful with the time I had left I triggered the bomb release twice.

 

My gunner, still screaming, had found the trigger for his gun and was firing wildly at the plethora of enemy aircraft that filled almost his entire field of view. The bombs I'd dropped were starting to fall behind, being powered only by the force of gravity, while we were still hurtling down at full power. With one eye on the altimeter, I picked my moment to pull out of the dive. Cut the throttle, deploy flaps and pull back on the stick like my life depended on it. (which it did) We leveled out 5 metres from the surface of the water, full throttle again and I kept up the pressure on the controls, I needed altitude.

 

The bombs I'd released earlier slammed into the barges, almost vapourising them. Amusingly this caused some trouble for the gaggle of enemy fighters on my tail, as the blast plucked two of them out of the air and smashed them into the surface of the water. Having regained a little bit of altitude I considered my options. The possibility of my plane making it back to base sat somewhere between slim and nil, but I had spotted a giant seaplane on the water a short distance away, I adjusted course and firewalled the throttle again.

 

This whole time the plane had been taking fire from multiple enemy aircraft. Did I mention earlier that the BSH-1 is a solid aircraft? I mean it is a solid aircraft, the Russians have never been a people for half-measures, and even less so under the current regime. The only downside is it flies like a house with an engine. Even so the damage was taking its toll, everything felt sluggish, we were leaking fuel, the engine was starting  to lose power. I pulled the bomb toggle a few more times, figuring they aren't doing me any good strapped to the belly of my plane. Another enemy plane broke up mid-air, debris raining down into the lake.

 

My plane was finished, only two things left to do. I nosed up slightly, aligning the sights on the huge enemy transport ahead of me and released my final two bombs. "Bail out!" My gunner had stopped screaming now, but was still firing with grim determination at the planes behind us. "What?" He looked over his shoulder at me, nodded, stowed his gun and prepared to bail out. "But what about you?" "If I don't hold the plane steady you will never get out. Jump!" As ordered, he bailed out. With the plane disintegrating under the constant stream of enemy fire I prepared to do the same, all of a sudden the engine stopped. Smoke belched from the engine, obscuring my vision, then I felt the heat of the flames. No way was I riding this one out, settling into my parachute harness I quickly prayed that I wouldn't be hit by my own plane and jumped...

 

*actually, the game crashed.



Pogo68 #7 Posted 18 December 2013 - 06:11 PM

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Love to be able to put down what I did to get 7 kills in the Hawk 75, but it's a blur.

 

I remember is a swirling fight over the harbor.

Seeing two friendlies being attacked by three or four fighters, so I dove to try to help.

I spot one friendly with two enemy fighters shooting at it so I aimed for the lead pursuer and gave it a long burst getting hits as I dove through them.

At this point I noticed that they were mostly bi-planes so I resolve to avoid the turn fight and go vertical and reposition for a second pass.

From here on it becomes a blur of diving passes, Immelman turns, slashing attacks and rolling evasions, fleeting shots at enemy planes as they flashed by, getting two kills and more enemy planes joining the fray and the other two friendlies going down.

 

The only clear memory I have of the ensuing 3 v 1 fight is going into an extended half loop with an enemy bi-plane;s guns hammering at my Hawk and watching as I hung upside down as the bi-plane followed me into the vertical and its suddenly nosed down as it stalled.

Seeing my opportunity I pull back on the stick, chop the idle the throttle and dropped the sights in front of the bi-plane and cut loose with my guns.

 


Edited by Pogo68, 18 December 2013 - 06:11 PM.

DICTA BOELCKE for WoWP
    1. Try to secure the upper hand before attacking.
    2. Always continue with an attack you have begun
    3. Open fire only at close range, and then only when the opponent is squarely in your sights
    4. You should always try to keep your eye on your opponent, and never let yourself be deceived by ruses
    5. In any type of attack, it is essential to assail your opponent from behind
    6. If your opponent dives on you, do not try run away from his attack, but fly to meet it
    7. When over the enemy's lines, always remember your own line of retreat
    8. It is better to attack in groups of four or six. Avoid two aircraft attacking the same opponent

Jakeman113 #8 Posted 24 December 2013 - 02:16 PM

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Like above, it's a blur. Ok, here goes. On Harbor, the autopilot engages, so when the map loads for me, the fight has already started. My Demon dives into the fight, MGs blazing. I try to escape, but there are at least 5 enemy fighters swirling around me and maybe 2 friendlies. So, :kamikaze: A Hawk 75M (I think) starts shooting at me, so I desperately start juking, weaving, and rolling, up until match ends. The tail-gunner is screaming something I can't hear over the machine guns and the roar of the engines. Eventually, I down a bogey, almost accidentally. I then glance at the rosters, and see that there's one tango left, and he's almost next to me. By now, half of my team is with us, and I snap off a shot at the enemy, not splashing him, but an ally gets him moments later. End result, one kill, one assist, and several damages. Back in the hangar, I gape at the riddled right wing, almost sheared off by the enemy rounds. But, at least we won! :medal:




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